Review: Fantastic Four By Jonathan Hickman (Volume One)

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FF Hickman Omnibus Vol 1

During Jonathan Hickman’s original 2009-12 tenure on Fantastic Four¸ everyone was raving about it. I was sceptical. I’d read them on and off, and they seemed generally great to look at but otherwise a bit of an unfinished muddle.

I was wrong.

The true beauty of Hickman’s style can’t be grasped in a few issues picked up intermittently. You need to have faith in the writer. This story is a long, but ultimately rewarding, one. He’s playing with the core foundations of the FF, and drawing threads throughout. This much should be evident from the very first storyline, The Bridge – not technically part of the main title, but essential if you’re to get to grips with why the following events take place.

It’s tied into Dark Reign, in which Norman Osborn is in charge of – well, essentially world security, and unlike many tie-ins, doesn’t suffer from this tether. There’s a heightened tension as Osborn and co. storm the Baxter Building, while the actual FF are otherwise engaged. That means it’s down to Franklin and Valeria, Reed and Sue’s children, to fend them off.

In order to do so, Valeria uses all her wits, and Franklin dresses like a cowboy.

The Bridge doesn’t entirely work as a narrative because it may be fun, but it also appears pretty pointless, at least what’s happening to Sue, Ben, and Johnny. Yet in hindsight, it sets up the rest of this omnibus surprisingly well. First off, we get to see how capable the kids are, and how they can be relied upon. Franklin may seem like he’s messing about, but you shouldn’t underestimate him. Valeria, meanwhile, is arguably smarter than her father. These two are absolute joys to read about, not just in The Bridge but in the omnibus as a whole.

FF Dark Reign Franklin Richards

Otherwise, there’s Reed’s hopelessness at facing the future, a major motivation throughout, and foreshadowing an uneasy feeling that all that’s about to happen is his fault, especially the direct consequences on the rest of his family.

After a brief interlude focusing on the secret intentions of both Namor and Dr Doom (both of whom get up to some interesting things later on in the book), we come to Idea #101: Solve Everything, also the title of the second storyline (or the debut of Hickman on the proper Fantastic Four series).

That the writer’s plans are ambitious should be immediately obvious. Reed meets the Council, an interfering bunch of arrogant know-it-alls with God complexes. They’re all Reed. That is, they’re all different versions of Mr Fantastic from alternating universes. It’s an exceptionally intriguing idea, one that ends by re-establishing a key part in FF lore: that each member is an oddity, but that their sense of family will always draw them back together.

Interestingly, it may seem that ‘our’ Reed proves himself a superior being because he can let the rest of the multiverse get on with whatever it’s doing, that he can leave behind his ambition to solve everything, to come back, as ever, to his loving family and friends. But it’s not all it appears: Reed is indulging in his own God complex, fulfilling that same desire through different means to be “a better man.” Needless to say, this isn’t fully wrapped up: the Council remains an undercurrent, as does Richards’ connection with his father.

This omnibus collects six graphic novels (the Dark Reign prelude, debut arc of FF aka the Future Foundation, and four of the core title), but it feels like more than that and, paradoxically, only one. That’s because it’s one ongoing narrative, separated into loose parts, and further segmented into chapters. Prime Elements, the third collection, sets up many principle ideas, but, let’s face it, is also a bit of a mess.

FF Mole Man Eaglesham

Certainly, if I’d have picked it up as a lone graphic novel, I would’ve been disappointed. It feels like samplers: small notional injections, not full explorations. They’re typically-single issues used to remind you of particular sections of the FF mythology.

They draw on the bases of the team, established by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in those early years: Mole Man and Subterranea; Atlantis; the Inhumans; Annihilus and the Negative Zone; space exploration; and evolution. Hickman has looked back at the successes and said to himself, ‘how can we move these on?’ On the whole, this has been a very positive idea, but some, at least with this initial omnibus, come across as half-baked. The potential return of the Inhumans, in particular, seems like a pointless thread. The final page of this omnibus (the storyline, rather, not the extra cover gallery, and script – both excellent inclusions) hammers this home. It’s such a strange place to leave the readers. But then, with Hickman’s intricate storytelling technique, where else would be appropriate?

Some may argue it should’ve concluded with Three, the tale that hit the headlines upon its initial release. One of the Fantastic Four, we were promised, would die. It would change the series forever. Even if the inclusion of Tomorrow (the first volume of the FF) feels like a jolt, it’s nice to see the further shockwaves of this death. I won’t spoil that revelation – although a quote on the book’s back cover does so regardless.

FF Galactus Silver Surfer

Three, it initially seems, is the storyline in which all these dangling tales come together. Indeed, it’s masterfully done. The team are separated and each member faces a huge threat. All are in danger. The actual death is done beautifully. Really, you can’t fault it.

It’s plotted sublimely, and Steve Epting’s art just heightens the experience. It looks so lifelike and rich. The small moments are as important as the big. In fact, seeing the Silver Surfer again, combined with a truly breathtaking cliffhanger to the opening part of Three – “unacceptable” – is spine-tingling.

Elsewhere, much of the art is the same, largely provided by Dale Eaglesham and Neil Edwards, two artists whose work is always solid and nice to look at, but are nonetheless similar. Maybe that’s to its advantage, but it comes as a shock when the more stylised visuals of Nick Dragotta, Sean Chen, and Barry Kitson are thrown into the mix. It admittedly is a beautiful omnibus to flick through – and nothing important is lost to the gutter – and this is aided by the colours used to maintain the same tone, no matter where the action takes us.

There’s a cinematic, landscape look from start to finish, and the artists make appealing directorial choices. Edwards especially plays with page layouts in the fourth volume, Future Foundation: he explores great vistas before cropping close to the central characters for reaction shots and body language.

This storyline follows Prime Elements and acts best as a prelude to what happens after Three. It celebrates what makes Fantastic Four so special in the comic book world, encompassing a jovial interlude with Arcade, a time-travelling twisting tale taking us back to Reed and Ben’s college days, and wrestling with the Thing’s problematic appearance.

FF Thing Three

Aside from that, Reed actually sets up the Future Foundation, perhaps as a reaction to seeing distorted versions of himself. Instead, he realises that the children are the future.

The Foundation plays a huge part in what’s to come, but we only get a taste of this with the final collected story, Tomorrow. The good news is: Spider-man’s part of the team! That’s awesome. Spidey is a much-loved character who’s always been on the periphery of the FF; to have him right in amongst it all bodes well for the second volume.

And that’s the biggest problem with this book: it’s incomplete. Threads are left hanging. The future is uncertain. There are still so many imminent threats. Mind you, if you’ve read this omnibus, you’ll definitely want to pick up volume two.

Jonathan Hickman’s run is perfect for this omnibus range. You need to read it in one go (or rather, in two volumes) to get the full impact and to properly see what he’s doing. Fantastic Four by Jonathan Hickman: Volume One is a great read; certainly not one you’ll want to miss out on.

And a large part of this fascination is the magnetism of the phrase, “all hope lies with Doom.”

FF Hickman Omnibus Vol 1 Rating

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Hickman’s FF: Vol 2 in November

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Fantastic Four Vol 2

Good news for fans of Jonathan Hickman’s Fantastic Four: a follow-up to last year’s omnibus is on the way!

The second book picks up where Volume 1, released in October, left off, with the newly-formed FF after – SPOILERS – the death of Johnny Storm. Here’s the synopsis:

Superstar writer Jonathan Hickman revamps and redefines Marvel’s First Family! The War of Four Cities escalates, with the Future Foundation caught in the middle! But as the Inhumans return to Earth, and Annihilus’ forces and the Kree armada lay siege to the planet, will the coming of Galactus turn the tide — or doom us all? When the Future Foundation contends with the Council of Reeds and the Mad Celestials, Valeria turns to their greatest foe! Find out why all hope lies in Doom! And in the aftermath of an endgame beyond imagination, the FF explore the furthest reaches of the Marvel Universe — from Wakanda to the Negative Zone, from the past to the future!

Collects FF (2011) #6- 23, and Fantastic Four #600- 611 and #605.1.

It comes with a great cover by Gabriele Dell’Otto and a bevy of interior artists including Steve Epting, Greg Tocchini, Barry Kitson, Nick Dragotta and Ron Garney.

The 832-page HC is released in November 2014.

Annihilation Omnibus Announced!

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Marvel has released details of an upcoming omnibus in their February solicitations; it’s a greatly-wanted book that’s expected to be published in May 2014 (though that’s unconfirmed for now…).

Annihilation Omnibus 

ANNIHILATION OMNIBUS

Written by Keith Giffen; Dan Abnett; Andy Lanning; Javier Grillo-Marxuach; Simon Furman; Christos Gage; and Stuart Moore.

Art by Mitch Breitweiser; Scott Kolins; Ariel Olivetti; Kev Walker; Renato Arlem; Greg Titus; Jorge Lucas; Andrea Di Vito; Giuseppe Camuncoli; and Mike McKone.

Cover art by Gabriele Dell’otto.

Marvel’s cosmic superstars return in explosive, widescreen sci-fi style! Annihilus, lord of the Negative Zone, has declared war! And as his unstoppable Annihilation Wave swarms into the Marvel Universe, demolishing all in its path, only a handful of heroes can resist the destruction! Nova learns the ways of war from Drax the Destroyer; the Silver Surfer seeks out his former master, Galactus, for aid; the Super-Skrull fights for his son’s life; and Ronan the Accuser faces Gamora and her woman warriors! Nova and Quasar’s army leads the charge — but as heroes fall and Annihilus rises, the universe’s one remaining hope may be Thanos, the Mad Titan!

Collects: Drax the Destroyer #1- 4; Annihilation: Prologue; Annihilation: Nova #1- 4; Annihilation: Silver Surfer #1- 4; Annihilation: Super-Skrull #1- 4; Annihilation: Ronan #1- 4; Annihilation #1- 6;  Annihilation: Heralds of Galactus #1- 2; and Annihilation: Nova Corps Files.

880 PGS.

RRP: $125 (Expected c. £75.)

Spider-Man Reprint Price Increase: A Taste of Things To Come?

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A few days ago, I bought you news of the latest batch of Marvel Omnibus Reprints being reduced in price by Amazon UK to just £46.50. The first of these reprint, Amazing Spider-Man: Volume One, was released yesterday, and Amazon has put the price up…

… To £75.

ASM omnibus at Amazon

Of course, this might just be a brief mistake and the price might drop down again. Or it could be a taste of things to come. At the moment, other reprints – including Daredevil by Frank Miller, Uncanny X-Men: Volume 1 and Fantastic Four: Volume 1 and 2 – are still up for pre-order for £46.50.

But will those prices increase when they’re released?

We have to wait until 17th September, when the Uncanny X-Men goes on sale, to find out.

Also of note: despite being a brand-new book, this Spider-Man omnibus is only dispatched within 1 to 3 working weeks. Seems a bit lax, don’t you think?! Are they just covering themselves – and if so, why this product specifically?

Otherwise, head to Forbidden Planet.co.uk, which lists this book at £50.25.

UPDATE: Thanks for everyone who either commented – here’s looking at you, Eamon – or emailed me to let me know that, thankfully Amazon UK has dropped the price back down to £46.50. My copy (from Forbidden Planet.co.uk) was delivered a few days ago – and I love it. Let me know if you’ll be buying this beaut of a book!

Amazon UK’s August Savings: Fantastic Four, Deadpool & Reprints!

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Thanks to Peter Hardy for letting me know about these amazing Amazon UK deals…

Image

Jonathon Hickman’s Fantastic Four (due out in October) has a massive 54% off the RRP, bring the £75 label down to just £34.71. The 800-page book collects Dark Reign: Fantastic Four #1-5, Dark Reign: The Cabal, Fantastic Four #570-588, and
FF #1-5.

And January’s Deadpool By Joe Kelly 1160-page omnibus is just £50.74!

And perhaps most importantly for those desperate to read those long-since out-of-print books, Amazon have them on pre-order for £46.50 each. These are: Amazing Spider-Man: Volume One; Uncanny X-Men: Volume One; Daredevil By Frank Miller; Fantastic Four: Volume One and Fantastic Four: Volume Two.

Once again, big thanks to Peter Hardy – and if you spot any deals I should know about, please email me!

“Solve Everything”: 40% Off Hickman’s FF!

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Get 40% off Jonathan Hickman’s Fantastic Four Omnibus Volume 1 when you pre-order before Wednesday 1st May!

Hickman's FF

The 736-page book is due out in October 2013, priced £55.99 – but if you go to ForbiddenPlanet.co.uk now, you can get 40% off that RRP, bringing it down to just £33.59.

The newly-announced omnibus collects together the first part of Hickman’s critically-acclaimed run that includes the ground-breaking Three storyline – in which a lead member of the Fantastic Four dies! – and launches the new FF series (that’s the Future Foundation). Here’s the full synopsis:

Superstar writer Jonathan Hickman revamps and redefines Marvel’s First Family in a sweeping and epic saga across time, space and reality! And it all begins when Mr. Fantastic decides to solve everything! As the team contends with Norman Osborn’s Dark Reign, an older Franklin arrives from the future with an ominous warning! And as the Fantastic Four fight the War of the Four Cities, Mr. Fantastic assembles a band of genius youngsters.

But when Nathaniel Richards returns, Galactus rises and a new Annihilation Wave threatens to invade from the Negative Zone, tragedy suddenly strikes. Grieving, the surviving members of the Fantastic Four dissolve the team — but from its ashes rises the Future Foundation! Guest-starring Spider-Man, Dr. Doom, Sub-Mariner and the Inhumans!

Collects Dark Reign: Fantastic Four #1-5, Fantastic Four #570-588, FF #1-5 and material from Dark Reign: The Cabal #1; written by Jonathan Hickman; pencilled by Sean Chen, Dale Eaglesham, Neil Edwards, Steve Epting, Nick Dragotta and Barry Kitson, with cover artwork by Alan Davis.

I expect fp.co.uk’s price to increase to about £38 after this promotion, and anyone who wants to explore the team that kick-started the Marvel Universe is well-advised to pick the book.

Hickman's FF 2

I particularly like this run as one of its titles quotes my favourite band, The Killers: ‘When Everything’s Lost, the Battle is Won… Because of All These Things I’ve Done.’

Pre-order before Wednesday 1st May 2013 here.

(Thanks to Rubèn.)

MarvelNOW! Omnibus…?

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Marvel will reportedly publish an omnibus next year collecting the first issue of all their new MarvelNOW! titles.

Marvel NOW

The book, supposedly 688 pages long, will print such comics as Uncanny Avengers #01; Fantastic Four #01; Thor #01; Nova #01 and All-New X-Men #01, featuring writers like Rick Remender, Brian Michael Bendis and Matt Fraction, and artists like Mike Allred, Stuart Immonen and Esad Ribic.

The HC is rumoured to have a cover by Joe Quesada.

All-New X-men

MarvelNOW! is a relaunch of their core titles, shaking up the creative teams. Brian Michael Bendis, for instance, has been on the Avengers titles since c. 2005’s Disassembled – but is now working on All-New X-Men.

I have a few titles on standing order, including Captain America – just knowing John Romita Jr is on the book is enough to guarantee its inclusion in my pull list! – X-Men: Legacy (writer, Si Spurrier, is at the top of his game), and FF (with art that I initially disliked… but now I absolutely love). My surprise purchase, though, is Journey Into Mystery. I can’t even describe how good it is. Just pick it up.

JiM 656

It’ll be a new direction for the omnibus line, but a step which isn’t unheard of for comic fans: DC published a similar collection, with all the first issues of their ‘52’ titles.

The MarvelNOW! Omnibus is expected in June 2013.

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